logo

Useful Blogs for App Promotion

500,000 monthly readers are maximizing their advertising conversions with conversion intelligence.

The average online user is exposed to anywhere from 6,000 to 10,000 ads every day.

Home Blog App Marketing ASO Techniques: How to Optimize Your Keywords in 2021

ASO Techniques: How to Optimize Your Keywords in 2021

Mar 3 2021

keyword of ASO


APP keywords is the foundation of ASO optimization, this foundation if built in line with the planning, reasonable, then for the future optimization work will be much easier, but also easier to achieve the desired effect. On the contrary, if the APP keyword selection is not reasonable, then in the future optimization process will be difficult, the following summary of the ASO keyword coverage process can help the APP operators of some common problems.


How to optimize app store keywords


Since the App Store search engine doesn't scan the App Description, all you have to work with is the 100-character Keyword field, the App Name and the IAP Display Names. You could even work with the Publisher Name, but only if you haven't published in the App Store yet.

Your app will only appear in the search results for keywords and key phrases present in those fields, so it's a hard decision to make. For instance, each one of my games required hours of keyword optimization study. There are, of course, some best practices that can help you make the most of keywords. Here are some things to consider when choosing your keywords:

Keyword relevancy -- When it comes to choosing your keywords, it's important to keep it simple and relevant. Your conversion rate on keywords impacts the algorithm, so if you're using keywords that are off-target and not resulting in conversions, Apple will lower your rankings for that keyword.

Narrow it down -- Don't be afraid to start with an extensive list of keywords, but when it comes time to actually use them in your ASO, you need to choose the best of the best -- and use them in the right places. App Samurai says you shouldn't reuse your keywords, so you need to use the right keyword in the right field.

Target keywords with less competition -- We all know how important it is to rank highly in search results but apptamin says, "top 3 search results grab over 75% of the total organic downloads on a branded search and nearly 50% for searches using generic terms." So, it's wise to choose keywords with less competition whenever possible.

Track your keyword performance -- Once you've decided on your keywords and put them to work in your ASO strategy, don't forget to monitor their performance. After 3-4 weeks you should be able to get metrics from the app stores and see how your strategy is working.

Give your Keywords a chance to work -- It might be tempting to keep tinkering with your keywords, but if you change them too often it can impact your conversion rates, and lead to lower rankings in the app store.

The App Store keyword splitting and word formation principle


Background keywords added by Apple developers when submitting applications for review in the background, up to a total of 100 characters, so called 100 characters.

Because Apple keyword coverage is mainly by splitting 100 characters and then combining them to form coverage volume.

The App Store will split 100 characters into the smallest units and then group them together, and the closer the words are, the higher the probability of being grouped together.

Therefore, it is recommended that very important keywords are placed in front and comma, other keywords do not add a comma to let Apple's own word grouping. Fully understand Apple's rules, you can reduce the waste of characters and cover more words.

App Store: The character limit for keywords is 100 characters. Apple's search algorithm will automatically group keyword phrases so it's best to incorporate as many single keywords as possible. 

Google Play: There is not a keyword field in the Google Play Store like there is in the Apple App store. Once you've identified your keywords, they should be incorporated into the title and description.

However, Google treats keyword spamming in their app store the same way they treat it on the web. Never list out your keywords. They should be used in context and repeated with good frequency throughout your description (instead of lumping them together in one area).

Some industry experts advise using your top keyword 4-5 times in the description. However, that advice should be taken with caution. Using a keyword five times in a description that's only 100 words long may come across to Google as keyword spamming.

Remove all spaces


This is a common mistake. Afraid the App Store will read all their keywords as a giant nonsensical keyword, some developers use spaces and commas to separate words. This is unnecessary and reduces the number of keywords you can use, since spaces are counted as characters.

The App Store algorithm reads both spaces and commas as separators. So, next time you're filling the Keywords field, don't write your keywords as "magic, amazing, to, do, list." Follow the iTunes Connect tip and write them as "magic,amazing,to,do,list."

No human will be reading this list, so you can skip the spaces between keywords and save yourself a few characters. As long as you separate your keywords with a "," Apple will see them as separate keywords. What you save in spaces can easily add up to one or more additional keywords.

In our example, stripping all the spaces after the commas saved 7 characters, bringing our character-count to just 56. But there's still more to squeeze out.

Don't use unnecessary keywords


The App Store indexes applications automatically by additional keyword searches. For example, if your application is in the Free Games category, your set of keywords is going to be automatically added with such keywords as "free" and "games." You will not need to add them one more time in your metadata.

This as well relates to the words in other categories and subcategories that your application belongs to. For instance, let's assume that your application is in two categories in the same time: Tools and Entertainment. It is going to be indexed by these queries even if you haven't added them in your metadata yourself.

Brand searches


According to the App Store and Google Play regulations, you can't use and mention the names of famous brands and trademarks. So, what do you do, if you really want your application to be searched by the name of your direct competitors?

On the App Store, you can use minor tricks and add brand names. Also, you can use competitor names' variations written with typos, or use several of the first letters from a brand's name.

But, before adding such keywords to your texts, make certain to check if users actually use such queries. And keep in mind that such work with brand name queries is nonetheless an indirect breach of markets' regulations and competitors can file a complaint against you. By no means should you add brand names and trademarks into the name, subtitle, and descriptions.

Keyword optimization requires patience and attention to detail. For instance, when deleting a keyword, check and make sure you're not losing good key phrases that use it. These tips will help you use all available character spaces to their fullest extent, getting you the best results within the limits we have as iOS developers.


SHARE THIS POST


All content, layout and frame code of all ASOWorld blog sections belong to the original content and technical team, all reproduction and references need to indicate the source and link in the obvious position, otherwise legal responsibility will be pursued.

Comments

  • Ebony Fuller
    How to choose my first Google Play ASO keyword? Reply
    • Ebony Fuller

      @Ebony Fuller If you are just getting started with App Store Optimization for Google Play, some of the concepts can be a little confusing and maybe even a little counterintuitive. Reply

    • Ebony Fuller

      @Ebony Fuller Just because you add a keyword to your app’s metadata, does not mean that you will automatically rank for it. Some app publishers add a target keyword to the description of their app multiple times and wonder why they aren’t ranking. Reply

    • Ebony Fuller

      @Ebony Fuller It is because there are many other factors that go into search rankings, in addition to the presence of keywords. Things like a number of downloads, ratings, uninstalls and engagement all play a role in determining the overall rankings strength of your app. Reply

    • Ebony Fuller

      @Ebony Fuller On top of this, nobody knows exactly how Google ranks apps. The algorithm is a closely guarded secret. But we do know enough of the major factors to make App Store Optimization very worthwhile. Now that you understand what to expect from this process, here are the three primary criteria you have to look at when choosing your first keyword. Reply

  • Ervin Ortiz
    How to analyze and find appropriate keywords to install in google play? Reply
    • Geneva Nguyen

      @Ervin Ortiz As a first step, app developers and marketers usually start by setting up a collection of search terms that people use to find apps in the app stores. Following suit, you should think of terms people might use to search for your mobile apps. This can be your brand name, app name, and main app functionalities. Keyword research is one of the most time-intensive tasks in the ASO workflow. Reply

    • Geneva Nguyen

      @Ervin Ortiz obtaining keywords and keyword inspiration from app store auto-suggestions are practical because you automatically get a sense of what other keywords the app store algorithms think are relevant to the one you just searched. By starting with auto-suggested app keywords you already have a good base of potential keywords and you didn't do any manual work at all. Reply

    • Geneva Nguyen

      @Ervin Ortiz After you have a list of keywords you need to choose which ones to implement in your app's metadata. Be aware that not all keywords might give you good results. This depends on several factors including popularity, difficulty, and relevancy. If your app is published in Google Play and the App Stores, you may already be ranking for keywords you were unaware of before. Reply

  • Bryan Reynolds
    How do I optimize my Android for Google Play? Reply
    • Dominic Hudson

      @Bryan Reynolds There are many factors that contribute to a mobile app’s success on the market. Apart from the overall and value it delivers, it must also be easy to find by potential users. Reply

    • Dominic Hudson

      @Bryan Reynolds If you run an Android app, one of the key ways of ensuring its high discoverability is by optimizing it for Google Play Store - so, making it stand out among the tens of other options available. Especially, as we’re talking about 2.9 million apps on Google Play worldwide! Reply

  • Warren Hart
    How do you rank higher on Google Play store? Reply
    • Stephen Austin

      @Warren Hart Similar to Apple App Store search guides, you must put your main keywords in the title of your Google Play Store app. This will increase your Android app's chances to rank better for those targeted keywords. According to MobileDevHQ, app titles that have keywords in them have 10.3% higher ranking than those that don't. Reply

  • Lowell Riley
    Is A/B testing perfect? Reply
    • Lowell Riley

      @Lowell Riley A/B testing is not perfect. First of all A/B testing is used to determine which is better, the new idea or the existing product. In other words, the existing product already satisfies a certain need of the user. Then we use the AB testing method to try new improvements or new features. Reply

    • Lowell Riley

      @Lowell Riley If a brand new product is launched to market, A/B testing won't help you. For example, if a social product is completely changed into a game, then A/B testing will not be useful at all. Reply

    • Lowell Riley

      @Lowell Riley Also, A/B testing focuses on validation and analysis of product decisions, not on generating them. For example, if you want to experiment with a lottery feature, the lottery feature, instead of coming from A/B testing, is your own understanding of user needs. Reply

    • Lowell Riley

      @Lowell Riley If you never use A/B testing, then the most suitable scenario for A/B testing is when you next revamp your product, or put on new features. In the past, when the product was revamped or new features were added and went live without testing, you may have actually made your users active or turned down by 5%, but you didn't notice it. Reply

    • Lowell Riley

      @Lowell Riley Now you can experiment with AB testing methods before you go live to see what changes in user data will occur, and only those changes that make you get growth you go live, and you can achieve continuous optimization iteration of the product and continuous improvement. Reply

  • Armando Goodwin
    Hi, about A/B testing, which makes more sense, pushing different campaigns to the same user group or pushing different people to the same campaign? Reply
    • Bradford Holland

      @Armando Goodwin The best way is to first determine the main content and main framework of the app, and then create the app, which can use different design layouts and design ideas. Push the app to all users first, then compare different designs with A/B testing to verify which one is better, and push the best design solution to all users. Reply

    • Bradford Holland

      @Armando Goodwin Then use this version as the basis to do further optimization, including showing different content and ideas to different groups of people. For different groups of people, a more effective classification method is to classify according to user needs, for example, from what search terms. We can use targeted trials to show them different versions of the app. Reply

    • Bradford Holland

      @Armando Goodwin Of course, such a personalized display strategy, or to compare the original that does not personalize the benchmark page, A/B test to see which is better, and then only the better strategy to go online. Reply

  • Tina Wolfe
    How do reviews affect my app? Reply
    • Lynn Carroll

      @Tina Wolfe Positive ratings and reviews, both in terms of quality and quantity, have a huge impact on your App Store Optimization efforts. It’s in your best interest to get as many as you can. Reply

    • Lynn Carroll

      @Tina Wolfe Of course, they need to be honest reviews from people who have actually downloaded the app. Reply

    • Lynn Carroll

      @Tina Wolfe You can encourage users you know through word of mouth to leave a good review of your app on the App Store or Google Play. Reply

    • Lynn Carroll

      @Tina Wolfe Another way to get app store reviews might be sending a push notification to encourage users to review your app (as long as you’ve gotten permission to send push notifications!). Reply

    • Lynn Carroll

      @Tina Wolfe You can also have an in-app pop-up notification asking the user to leave a good review if he or she liked it. Reply

  • Kelli Chambers
    how does the keyword research work? Reply
    • Dustin Becker

      @Kelli Chambers Before you actually publish your app with the keywords you have selected, though, you will want to do some research to learn about the traffic, difficulty, and demand for those keywords, as well as how many apps are already using it. Reply

  • Megan Brooks
    How to use keywords wisely? Reply
    • Richard Pearson

      @Megan Brooks Just like with app titles, how you should handle app keywords differs from the Apple App Store to Google Play. Reply

    • Richard Pearson

      @Megan Brooks With Apple, you get only 100 characters for all of your keywords, so obviously, you need to choose wisely; it should go without saying that you should get as close to this 100 character limit as you possibly can. Reply

    • Richard Pearson

      @Megan Brooks With Google Play, though, there is no specific keyword field. However, the app description is searchable, and you have a comfortable 4000 characters to work with. Reply

    • Richard Pearson

      @Megan Brooks For the best App Store Optimization, you’ll want to put your most important keywords in your description five times. However, be careful not to overdo it – keyword stuffing will get your app penalized (just like keyword stuffing on a website would get your site penalized by Google), leading to a drop in your ranking. Reply

    • Richard Pearson

      @Megan Brooks There’s a fine line between optimizing your app description, and stuffing it with keywords – the key is to make sure it reads well and makes sense for a person reading it, not just for the App Store algorithm! Reply

  • Dana Myers
    What is App Store Optimization? Reply
    • Carrie Cooper

      @Dana Myers Just like internet marketers use Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, to get their web pages ranking highly in Google’s search results, app developers must use App Store Optimization, or ASO, techniques to get their app to the top of the app store search results. Reply

    • Carrie Cooper

      @Dana Myers It can be seen as effectively App Store SEO. Unfortunately, the true algorithms for ranking in both Apple’s App Store and the Google Play store for Android apps, just like the true algorithms for SEO, are not actually known, and change regularly. However, we do know that certain things affect your App Store rankings more than others. Reply

    • Carrie Cooper

      @Dana Myers By taking advantage of this these App Store Optimization tips, your app could rank higher, be seen by more people, and receive more downloads. Reply

  • Anne Garcia
    What are the ASO ranking factors? Reply
    • Denise Hines

      @Anne Garcia The Apple and Google Play stores each have their own unique algorithm, but the main ranking signals are similar. Reply

    • Denise Hines

      @Anne Garcia The main factors that matters are Keywords in Metadata, App Download Volume, Conversion Rate, Ratings & Reviews. Reply

  • Tanya Fleming
    How do I optimize keywords in the app store? Reply
    • Milton Sherman

      @Tanya Fleming Place the strongest and more relevant key phrases in the App Name. Since the App Name has more weight in the algorithm, this is where you should place your best keywords and key phrases. The more relevant the term, the higher the conversion. When using key phrases, don't break them with other words. Reply

  • Irving Lambert
    How to choose my first Google Play ASO keyword? Reply
    • Tracey Dennis

      @Irving Lambert If you are just getting started with App Store Optimization for Google Play, some of the concepts can be a little confusing and maybe even a little counterintuitive. Reply

    • Tracey Dennis

      @Irving Lambert Just because you add a keyword to your app’s metadata, does not mean that you will automatically rank for it. Some app publishers add a target keyword to the description of their app multiple times and wonder why they aren’t ranking. Reply

    • Tracey Dennis

      @Irving Lambert It is because there are may other factors that go into search rankings, in addition to the presence of keywords. Things like number of downloads, ratings, uninstalls and engagement all play a role in determining the overall rankings strength of your app. Reply

    • Tracey Dennis

      @Irving Lambert On top of this, nobody knows exactly how Google ranks apps. The algorithm is a closely guarded secret. But we do know enough of the major factors to make App Store Optimization very worthwhile. Now that you understand what to expect from this process, here are the three primary criteria you have to look at when choosing your first keyword. Reply

  • Blake Norman
    How to analyze and find appropriate keywords to install in google play? Reply
    • Cody Conner

      @Blake Norman As a first step, app developers and marketers usually start by setting up a collection of search terms that people use to find apps in the app stores. Following suit, you should think of terms people might use to search for your mobile apps. This can be your brand name, app name, and main app functionalities. Keyword research is one of the most time-intensive tasks in the ASO workflow. Reply

    • Cody Conner

      @Blake Norman Obtaining keywords and keyword inspiration from app store auto-suggestions are practical because you automatically get a sense of what other keywords the app store algorithms think are relevant to the one you just searched. By starting with auto-suggested app keywords you already have a good base of potential keywords and you didn't do any manual work at all. Reply

    • Cody Conner

      @Blake Norman After you have a list of keywords you need to choose which ones to implement in your app's metadata. Be aware that not all keywords might give you good results. This depends on several factors including the popularity, difficulty, and relevancy. If your app is published in Google Play and the App Stores, you may already be ranking for keywords you were unaware of before. Reply

  • Mabel Burton
    How do I optimize my Android for Google Play? Reply
    • Theodore Simmons

      @Mabel Burton There are many factors that contribute to a mobile app’s success on the market. Apart from the overall and value it delivers, it must also be easy to find by potential users. Reply

    • Theodore Simmons

      @Mabel Burton If you run an Android app, one of the key ways of ensuring its high discoverability is by optimizing it for Google Play Store – so, making it stand out among the tens of other options available. Especially, as we’re talking about 2.9 million apps on Google Play worldwide! Reply

  • Daniel Fields
    What is a long tail keyword examples? Reply
    • Terrance Fuller

      @Daniel Fields Long-tail keywords are search phrases with longer word counts. Their length makes them more specific than searches with fewer words. “Buy breathable running socks” (4 words) is an example of a long-tail keyword, whereas “buy socks” is a short tail keyword. Reply

  • Lyle Coleman
    How to use keywords wisely? Reply
    • Joe Summers

      @Lyle Coleman Just like with app titles, how you should handle app keywords differs from the Apple App Store to Google Play. With Apple, you get only 100 characters for all of your keywords, so obviously, you need to choose wisely; it should go without saying that you should get as close to this 100 character limit as you possibly can. Reply

    • Joe Summers

      @Lyle Coleman With Google Play, though, there is no specific keyword field. However, the app description is searchable, and you have a comfortable 4000 characters to work with. Reply

    • Joe Summers

      @Lyle Coleman For the best App Store Optimization, you’ll want to put your most important keywords in your description five times. However, be careful not to overdo it – keyword stuffing will get your app penalized (just like keyword stuffing on a website would get your site penalized by Google), leading to a drop in your ranking. There’s a fine line between optimizing your app description, and stuffing it with keywords – the key is to make sure it reads well and makes sense for a person reading it, not just for the App Store algorithm! Reply

View more comments